human-vs-brand-consciousness

Social media scheduling – how can it help you?

There are few things as difficult as managing our own moods. Bad days happen, but how do we keep ourselves in check and maintain the standard set for our digital portfolios? How do we separate our human vices when we have to be so human on social media platforms?

For example: you’ve woken up on the wrong side of the bed, then everything went wrong and you arrive at your computer feeling exasperated, exhausted and awful. The last thing you want to do is be positive and inspiring on Facebook or Twitter. But you have to.

We’ve found that keeping a database of motivational posts and/or predetermining the content that goes out on your social media platforms helps a whole lot. That way you don’t have to think about what your audience is seeing and know that you are delivering the content that they originally came to you for. This is where major social media platforms are key: they have scheduling options that can be used to input a post and only release said posts on a future date. As a rule, our team sits around a table once a week to discuss what we’d like to see go up on each of our pages in the near future and we schedule them in as we go. It takes the pressures of dealing with the battle of brand versus human consciousness out of the equation.

We’d like to take this opportunity to tell each and every single social media manager that we get it. You are only human, but you’re a human that speaks to large audiences every single day of your working life and the stresses that are paired with that are daunting at best. We understand. You are not alone.

If you’re on a number of social media platforms that you’d like to schedule similar releases to simultaneously, or that might not have scheduling functionality, you can always look at using useful tools like the free service called Hootsuite or the paid for service, Sprout Social (which comes with its own nifty reporting tools to boot).

If you’d like to speak to us some more about dealing with these services, or you’d simply like to drop us a line to vent, Contact Us! We’ll always try our best to make sure you’re ready for anything.

Digital project management

Your digital portfolio

In this day and age, having digital representation can make all of the difference to your business and/or brand. You can opt for social media only or build yourself a nifty website to showcase even more of what your brand is about and pair the two to work together. Your “digital portfolio” is the collection of digital platforms your brand is represented on.

When you start building your “digital portfolio”, consider the following:

  1. How much do you have to say? If your brand is one that needs to keep people up to date on the hour every hour, use Twitter. You can write content on your website which automatically posts to Twitter, which not only saves you time, but keeps your following up to date.
  2. Is your brand image driven? Images get a lot of attention around the web, but over-posting images can result in less clicks to your brand. You can create a happy medium by using Pinterest and Instagram in line with a website that acts as a portfolio. Using platforms like Pinterest to post images and relevant links will keep your following satisfied and help get clicks to your website, whereas using Instagram creates a purely visual experience for your audience.
  3. Is information your only focus? There are brands that use their digital portfolios purely as a means to get information across to their following. These can be larger, traditional businesses. With brands like this, engagement with their following is minimal, because their posts are already informative. In this regard a good use of Facebook, Linked In and Twitter is advisable.
  4. What is your brand’s personality? It is very important to establish your brand’s personality early on in your digital portfolio. Treating your brand like an individual makes it easier for your audience to relate, so decide whether you want your brand to be seen as inspirational, hilarious, serious, purely professional or sociable. This can determine which social media platforms to be particularly active on. For example: Facebook and Twitter can be for all brand personalities, Linked In is purely professional, and Instagram and Pinterest can be seen as a social media platforms that inspire.

The wonderful thing about building your “digital portfolio” is that you don’t have to decide which platforms you want to be on right at the very beginning. Start small, use maybe one social media platform and let your website be your “home base“. You don’t have to catapult into a full digital strategy immediately, you can address this when traffic starts increasing considerably and there is a demand to engage with your audience on more than two platforms.

 

We invite you to take a browse around our site and if something tickles your fancy, and you’d like more information, feel free to contact us.